The message is getting more urgent. Although the Horn is already in a critical situation, the rains have been poor. And in Yemen the war makes intensifies the crisis.

This on Somalia: “Rainfall received in May was above that received in April, but total rainfall throughout the Gu season is still 30 to 60 percent below average in most areas of the country.”

This on Ethiopia: “Despite enhanced rainfall at the end of April into early May over many areas of Ethiopia, food security outcomes are still expected to deteriorate, particularly in southern and southeastern pastoral areas due to the late start, erratic, and below-average Gu/Genna rains. In portions of Somali Region, the accelerated loss of livestock has significantly expanded food consumption gaps, and Emergency (IPC Phase 4) outcomes are likely in the absence of sustained assistance during June to September. In lowland areas of SNNPR along the Rift Valley and in East and West Hararghe, southern Tigray, and portions of northern Amhara, projected outcomes are expected to move from Stressed (IPC Phase 2) to Crisis (IPC Phase 3), beginning in June, due to low household purchasing power and a lack of confirmed humanitarian assistance.”

This on Yemen: “Conflict in Yemen continues to be the primary driver of the largest food security emergency in the world. Currently, large populations face Crisis (IPC Phase 3) or Emergency (IPC Phase 4) acute food insecurity, the latter of which is associated with an increased risk of excess mortality. IDP populations and poor households in conflict zones are likely facing the most severe food security outcomes.”

The maps below tell the story graphically. How will the international community respond?

Martin


 

Somalia

 

Ethiopia

Yemen